More than just an English language tool

Susan Rudolph is the Newcomer teacher at Place Bridge Academy in Denver, Colorado, and works with students from all over the world. She often turns to Imagine Learning English to help supplement her curriculum, but she recently discovered this program does more than help her English learners with a new language — it has helped one young Yemenite in her classroom cope with some of life’s most difficult challenges.

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Reading success starts at home

Even the most meticulously planned literacy interventions fall short if students only get assistance at school. What your struggling readers do at home will either duplicate or undo the progress they make in your classroom. While many teachers assume parents know how to help their children read, a majority of parents report that they don’t know where to start.

Summer break is just around the corner, so now’s the time to arm your parents with valuable teaching tools. Pulling from Linda Baker’s Reading and Writing Quarterly article, we’ve got five simple ways you can help parents encourage reading in the home. And with that kind of parental support, students are sure to succeed.

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English learners learn a new culture too

Susan Rudolph is the Newcomer teacher at Place Bridge Academy in Denver, Colorado.  Most of her students are refugees from countries such as Nepal, Burma, and poor African nations.  These students often need education beyond reading and writing – many of them need to be taught how to turn on the lights or use an indoor restroom.  Ms. Rudolph is constantly reminded how different each cultures is.

“We were talking about why a book needs a cover,” Ms. Rudolph recalled, “and one of my students said, ‘So the ants don’t eat the pages.’  Who would think of that here?  But when you live in a place where ants are a major part of your life, you think of such things.”

We know many of you can relate to Susan Rudolph.  Being a teacher goes beyond the textbook.  Your kids are fortunate to have you!

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Seven ways to make reading exciting

Sample book found in Imagine Learning EnglishWhen you’re nine years old, what’s more exciting: a video game or a good book? Hopefully the book is an appealing option, but with flashing lights and cool gadgets as competition, an old-fashioned book isn’t always a student’s first choice. Children, especially struggling readers, are often attracted to media-rich components. So how can you help your students discover that books can come to life?

Making reading exciting for your students can be as easy as helping them find new ways to enjoy and make connections with the books they read. Try these tips that will not only help them understand books, but help bring them to life, too.

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