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Content Spotlight: Finding Evidence

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As we've mentioned in previous blog posts, our Fall 2015 content update introduced a variety of new language and literacy activities for children. We'll discuss two more of them below. Today's content spotlight focuses on the Finding Evidence activity suite, which introduces new literacy skills that cover even more state standards. These activities teach upper-grade elementary students what evidence is and and how to find appropriate evidence to support the author's claim. The Finding Evidence suite consists of two separate activities, What's Your Evidence and Evidence Needed. Here's how each activity works:

Imagine Learning blog on Finding Evidence suiteAs we've mentioned in previous blog posts, our Fall 2015 content update introduced a variety of new language and literacy activities for children. We'll discuss two more of them below.

Today's content spotlight focuses on the Finding Evidence activity suite, which introduces new literacy skills that cover even more state standards.

These activities teach upper-grade elementary students what evidence is and and how to find appropriate evidence to support the author's claim.

The Finding Evidence suite consists of two separate activities, What's Your Evidence and Evidence Needed. Here's how each activity works:

What's Your Evidence

In What's Your Evidence, students learn to define and understand the term "evidence" through vivid visuals and a short narrative. The activity teaches the importance of gathering evidence via a "whodunit-style" lesson.

First, students learn that someone has stolen a cookie. The narrator accuses her little sister of taking the cookie, but the girls' father wants evidence. What clues suggest the thief's identity? Are there any witnesses?

Eventually, the narrator finds appropriate evidence after examining the scene and interviewing a witness.

Imagine Learning blog on Finding Evidence suite What's Your Evidence screenshotDad screenshot from What's Your Evidence (in Imagine Learning 'Finding Evidence' activity suite)

Evidence Needed

In the second activity, Evidence Needed, students are presented with reading prompts and are asked to identify any supporting points and reasons. Students also begin to see how such concepts are presented in digital format, thus reducing any anxiety they may feel when taking an online assessment.

To begin, students encounter a reading passage and are asked to identify the main point (claim) of the passage. As a part of this process, students decide whether there is evidence (not just an opinion) to support the main point. If there is evidence, the student chooses the sentences that support the main point.

This activity provides the opportunity for students to identify main claims in a given reading passage, differentiate between passages that do or don't contain evidence, and observe how evidence strengthens an author's claim.

Evidence Needed also helps prepare students to be successful in current and future writing situations.

Imagine Learning, Evidence Needed screenshot of editor

Imagine Learning Evidence Needed 'Approved' sign for blog

 

How will your students benefit from Finding Experience? Please share your comments and ideas below.

Our blog periodically explores new activities and features in Imagine Learning, so stop by again to learn more!

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