Learning Out Loud: Readers Theater for Struggling Readers

 

Curtains Up leveled book, Imagine Language & Literacy If you have a struggling reader in your classroom, you already know how that student feels about reading anything out loud.

And yet, reading out loud is one of the best ways to improve students’ oral fluency.

For instance, within Imagine Language & Literacy, struggling readers gain confidence as they read and repeat text from leveled books and regularly participate in activities like Fluent Reader. What’s more, when teachers listen back to the recordings, they can easily track student progress toward oral fluency.

But Readers Theater can be another way to engage struggling readers and help them read aloud–with expression.

Why a Readers Theater?

If all the world’s a stage, then every classroom can be transformed into a theater–in this case, a Readers Theater, which: Read more »

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Are You a Lucky Limerick Writer? Enter Our 2017 Contest

Who writes limericks these days—a clever leprechaun, perhaps?

While we don’t know about leprechauns, we can tell you this: it’s time for Imagine Learning’s annual limerick contest, starring YOU—students from our partner schools across the country.

So, what is a limerick, anyway? Here’s an example:

You really don’t need to nitpick
when you write down your first limerick.
Just think of our theme,
Then, take time to dream.
Your rhyme’s sure to dazzle St. Patrick!

Now that you have a general idea of what a limerick is, watch The Limerick Song (below) to learn all the rules of limerick writing.

 

You can also view this video directly on Vimeo. Next–on to the rules! Read more »

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Why Teach Academic Language?

Every day in American schools, teachers welcome more students whose first language is something other than English.

According to the Pew Research Center, this demographic trend will only grow exponentially in coming years. In fact, Pew estimates up to 93% of our population will come from immigrant populations and their children by the year 2050.

academic language Imagine LearningWhat do these numbers mean for schools? Here’s the short answer: schools will need better ways to teach language generally, and academic language in particular.

Why the importance? When students don’t master academic language, they’re at greater risk for falling behind or even dropping out of school.

The Language of Textbooks

Learning to speak, read, and write in English can be challenging enough.

But without knowing academic language (e.g., general-instruction words like “summarize,” math words like “times” as another way to say “multiplied by,” or science words like “hypothesis”), English language learners can quickly fall behind in their progress. Read more »

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