Language Acquisition and the Mathematics Classroom

A guest post by Linda Hardman

President of Linda A. Hardman Consulting, Inc., teacher, and developer of multiple award-winning K12 math products

Imagine Learning now publishes monthly guest posts in order to stimulate conversations about K12 education across the country. Opinions expressed herein are those of the individual author and may not necessarily reflect the official opinion of Imagine Learning.

 

According to the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), the percentage of English language learners (ELL) in US public schools grew in the 2012–2013 school year by 9.2 percent (i.e., 4.4 million students) compared to the prior school year.

Additionally, a new Pew Research Center study reported that a near-record 13.9 percent of the US population today is foreign born, with 45 million immigrants residing here.

Wiki Commons photo, preschool kids, English language learners, academic language, math, math literacy

A diverse group of young students

Because of these trends, students are significantly challenged to master academic language across the US.

The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for mathematics are also placing high demands in mathematics regarding abstract and quantitative reasoning, constructing viable arguments and critiquing the reasoning of others, and looking for/expressing regularity in repeated reasoning.

Students and educators are even more challenged with the acquisition of academic language as a tool for mastering conceptual and procedural understanding of mathematical standards and practices.

As a result of the increasing amount of ELL students and the challenges presented by the CCSS for mathematics, it is important for students to acquire both academic language skills and mathematical fluency.

Moreover, the same essential reading components and first-language supports provided in reading classes also belong in the mathematics classroom.

Read more »

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Imagine Learning That’s Fun: Week of the Young Child 2016

Imagine Learning Week of the Young Child blog with mother and daughter photo cooking a meal togetherEvery year, the National Association for Education of the Young Child (NAEYC) celebrates early learners, parents, and teachers through a week-long celebration called the Week of the Young Child.

This year’s celebration will be April 11–15, 2016, and all children throughout the country are invited to celebrate!

In keeping with tradition, every day during WOYC has a special theme:

  • Music Monday – encourages children to enjoy songs, dances, rhythms, and movement at home and at school.
  • Taco Tuesday – inspires kids and family members to prepare and eat healthy foods and stay physically fit. This day is really about more than just tacos!
  • Work Together Wednesday – gives children an opportunity to work together to build something fun–from any material, indoors or out.
  • Artsy Thursday – allows kids to use their own creativity and imaginations as they create an art project.
  • Family Friday – brings families together and invites kids to show and tell their family stories.

Teachers, students, and parents can use their ingenuity to come up with projects and activities for all ages to enjoy. This is a great time to involve even the youngest children in your family or your class! Read more »

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Content Spotlight: Finding Evidence

Imagine Learning blog on Finding Evidence suiteAs we’ve mentioned in previous blog posts, our Fall 2015 content update introduced a variety of new language and literacy activities for children. We’ll discuss two more of them below.

Today’s content spotlight focuses on the Finding Evidence activity suite, which introduces new literacy skills that cover even more state standards.

These activities teach upper-grade elementary students what evidence is and and how to find appropriate evidence to support the author’s claim.

The Finding Evidence suite consists of two separate activities, What’s Your Evidence and Evidence Needed. Here’s how each activity works: Read more »

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Let’s Play Vocabulary Bingo!

Imagine Learning Vocabulary Bingo free printable blog post (bingo image from Wiki)Looking for a supplemental vocabulary activity for young learners? We’ve got just the thing: vocabulary bingo.

At Imagine Learning, we incorporate fun into every part of our language and literacy program. The reason is simple: we know that fun and learning go together.

To help educators, we also offer multiple offline teacher resources within the Imagine Learning program.

Each time teachers enter the Imagine Learning portal (Imagine Manager in older versions), they can choose offline activities like worksheets, coloring pages, and other printables.

Vocabulary bingo is just one example of a fun, engaging activity that teachers can print for their class. Read more »

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A Limerick Is a Rhyme Just in Time for St. Patty’s

Imagine Learning, Nick, The Limerick Song, video screenshot

Nick, the Limerick Maker

 

Hark, ye lasses and lads, it’s that time of year when leprechauns plan merry mischief in the green fields and woods.

It’s also time for Imagine Learning’s annual limerick contest. Here’s one to get you started:

There once was a young lad named Nick
Who loved to perform a neat trick:
He crafted a rhyme—
So fine; so sublime,
And called it his best limerick.

Can you beat Nick at his rhyming game? We’re betting you can. And you’ll learn all about rhyming in the bargain!

So, what should your subject be? Read more »

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