Show Your Pi Day Power

Imagine Math pi day logo You don’t have to be a math geek to love Pi Day (March 14)–but it helps!

Like many others throughout the world, the Imagine Learning family celebrates Pi Day with pie, from blueberry to lemon chiffon–the more flavors, the better. But eating a slice of pie is only one time-honored tradition on Pi Day.

Fun ‘Pi Day’ Facts

How much do you really know about Pi Day? Test your knowledge with a few fun facts: Read more »

Top

Hang Tight, Teachers–Summer’s Almost Here

Empty classroom, Imagine This blog, summer reading, celebrate end of school, accomplishments, personalized videoIt’s almost time for school to end for the year. And–if you’re like most educators–you’re counting the days until summer vacation.

But before you get there, why not take a little time to celebrate the great accomplishments of your class?

Imagine Learning can help make the end-of-year transition less hectic and a lot more fun.

Video fun

Your students have done a lot of learning this year, thanks to you. Sounds like a great excuse to make a personalized video! Read more »

Top

Rhyme and Repeat: 5 Poetry Activities Kids Will Love

Hey diddle diddle, poetry, rhymes, kids love poems, rhyming activities, classroom, memorize poem, poem in a pocket, celebrate poetry, Imagine Learning blog, rhyme and repeat

The cow jumped over the moon …

Hey diddle diddle …

You already finished the rhyme, didn’t you. Ever wondered why those childhood poems stick in your brain?

The answer is simple. Rhymes and poems have a beat.

At its essence, poetry is the most kinesthetic of all written forms. We can dance to it, sing to it, and feel to it. Poetry and rhyming tap into each listener’s heart and soul in ways that other texts may miss.

Imagine Learning blog, Rhyme and Repeat, Jabberwocky, Lewis Carroll, image, Wiki Commons

Jabberwocky

From an educational view, poetry also fosters social and emotional growth.

Sharing poetry also builds a sense of community within a group of listeners and fosters creativity.

Poems are great avenues for self-expression–among all cultures and languages. Students who don’t speak English in the classroom can still listen to, read, or write a poem in their own language. Poetry is universal!

Test it for yourself by reading the following lines aloud:

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

Thus begins one of the most beloved of children’s poems, “Jabberwocky,” by Lewis Carroll (from Alice Through the Looking Glass, and What She Saw There, 1872).

National Poetry Month may be nearing an end; but luckily, you can use poetry in the classroom all year round. Simply rhyme and repeat any of these activities in your class! Read more »

Top

Imagine Learning That’s Fun: Week of the Young Child 2016

Imagine Learning Week of the Young Child blog with mother and daughter photo cooking a meal togetherEvery year, the National Association for Education of the Young Child (NAEYC) celebrates early learners, parents, and teachers through a week-long celebration called the Week of the Young Child.

This year’s celebration will be April 11–15, 2016, and all children throughout the country are invited to celebrate!

In keeping with tradition, every day during WOYC has a special theme:

  • Music Monday – encourages children to enjoy songs, dances, rhythms, and movement at home and at school.
  • Taco Tuesday – inspires kids and family members to prepare and eat healthy foods and stay physically fit. This day is really about more than just tacos!
  • Work Together Wednesday – gives children an opportunity to work together to build something fun–from any material, indoors or out.
  • Artsy Thursday – allows kids to use their own creativity and imaginations as they create an art project.
  • Family Friday – brings families together and invites kids to show and tell their family stories.

Teachers, students, and parents can use their ingenuity to come up with projects and activities for all ages to enjoy. This is a great time to involve even the youngest children in your family or your class! Read more »

Top