Imagine Learning Talks About the Common Core Standards

Common Core, Imagine Learning, state standards, advocates, opponents, CCSS, benefits, classroom, assessments, tests, fact or fictionAt Imagine Learning, we’re quite familiar with the variety of opinions surrounding the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Although our own programs are aligned with multiple state standards (and not just the CCSS), we know what most educators are thinking on the subject. Here, we share a few of our findings.

What the Data Say

In August of 2015 a nationwide PDK/Gallup poll revealed that a majority of respondents oppose the teaching of Common Core. Interestingly, black and Hispanic respondents showed a lower level of opposition, at just 35 and 50 percent respectively.

In an earlier (2013) poll by PDK/Gallup, 72 percent of those polled indicated that they trust public school educators. But the same respondents also assume most educators oppose the CCSS, a view not aligned with the data.

In reality, 75 percent of educators support CCSS standards. Read more »

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The Truth About Game-Based Educational Software

Math-facts, game-based learning,, GSL, Big Brainz, Imagine Learning, math fluency

Math-fact gamification

Ask a typical educator about game-based learning and video games in school, and expect at least some skeptical responses.

Many educators and parents worry about gaming as an educational tool.

Research on the educational worth of video games has been mixed, and some educators point out the fact that most data come from short-term studies.

While research on educational software is still young, increasing evidence points to positive outcomes for today’s students—despite the prevalence of headlines linking video games to bad behavior or lukewarm learning outcomes.

According to James Gee, an education professor at Arizona State University, blaming all video games for poor results is like blaming all food for the existence of obese people.1 Read more »

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Content Spotlight: Finding Evidence

Imagine Learning blog on Finding Evidence suiteAs we’ve mentioned in previous blog posts, our Fall 2015 content update introduced a variety of new language and literacy activities for children. We’ll discuss two more of them below.

Today’s content spotlight focuses on the Finding Evidence activity suite, which introduces new literacy skills that cover even more state standards.

These activities teach upper-grade elementary students what evidence is and and how to find appropriate evidence to support the author’s claim.

The Finding Evidence suite consists of two separate activities, What’s Your Evidence and Evidence Needed. Here’s how each activity works: Read more »

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5 ways to survive standardized tests

It’s standardized test time — do you know where your sanity is?

As a teacher to some of the most tested–and stressed–students in the world, you really start to feel the pressure in March, when students around the country take out their number twos to show administrators what they (and, by extension, you) have been up to all school year.

Instead of sweating it, alleviate your anxiety with 5 test-tempering techniques:

 

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