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Empowering Autistic Students: 7 Strategies for Teachers

Each year during World Autism Awareness Day (April 2nd), advocates--and even corporate buildings--wear blue as they pledge to shine a light on autism. Those with available means also donate monetarily. To say that autism is an important cause would be an understatement. Today, more than 3.5 million Americans exhibit some type of autistic disorder. In fact, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that autism impacts one in sixty-eight births. Based on these statistics, it's a given that Pre-K and elementary school teachers will encounter students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in their classrooms. That said, children exhibiting signs of ASD may go undiagnosed, resulting in confusion for both teacher and student. Even if teachers know a student has ASD, they may not know the best learning and behavioral strategies for that student. In short, teachers need empowerment strategies--both for themselves and for their ASD students.
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When I grow up

Christian is a student at Noralto elementary school in northern California. He dreams of becoming a scientist. He also has autism. And with that, he has to navigate through a few obstacles that can disrupt his learning technique. But with Imagine Learning, he's learning how to learn, and in the process—raising the bar and scoring better on tests. 
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Behavior interventions for students with special needs

If you feel like more of your time is spent controlling your class than teaching them, it might be time for a new strategy. In Managing Classroom Behaviors, a recent article from Autism Society’s magazine, the Autism Advocate, education and children’s specialists Leah Gongola and Jennifer Sweeney shared two reinforcement strategies that teachers can use to reduce the time spent reprimanding student behaviors.
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Progress report: Students with autism

Christian is just like many other boys his age. He has friends, he likes to play video games, and he wants to become a scientist. But he’s also different: Christian has autism. He has unique needs and challenges when it comes to learning. In this short video, Christian and his teacher Heather Gold, talk about how Imagine Learning is helping students with special needs at Johnson Elementary School in Sacramento, California. Through tutorials, explicit instruction, continual assessment, and lots of repetition, Imagine Learning helps students like Christian maximize their potential, stay on track, and keep up with their peers. [jwplayer config="16x9" image="/sites/institutional/files/blog/2012/03/Sacramento_SwD.jpg" file="http://ilwebmedia.imaginelearning.com/Blog/Sacramento_SwD.mp4"]  
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