Imagine Learning Talks About the Common Core Standards

Common Core, Imagine Learning, state standards, advocates, opponents, CCSS, benefits, classroom, assessments, tests, fact or fictionAt Imagine Learning, we’re quite familiar with the variety of opinions surrounding the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Although our own programs are aligned with multiple state standards (and not just the CCSS), we know what most educators are thinking on the subject. Here, we share a few of our findings.

What the Data Say

In August of 2015 a nationwide PDK/Gallup poll revealed that a majority of respondents oppose the teaching of Common Core. Interestingly, black and Hispanic respondents showed a lower level of opposition, at just 35 and 50 percent respectively.

In an earlier (2013) poll by PDK/Gallup, 72 percent of those polled indicated that they trust public school educators. But the same respondents also assume most educators oppose the CCSS, a view not aligned with the data.

In reality, 75 percent of educators support CCSS standards. Read more »

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Math Teachers Who Undermine Math Fact Memorization

A guest post by Ben Harrison

Developer of Big Brainz math-fact fluency software

Imagine Learning now publishes monthly guest posts in order to stimulate conversations about K12 education across the country. Opinions expressed herein are those of the individual author(s) and may not necessarily reflect the official opinion of Imagine Learning.

The following article was originally posted in February, 2015 on the Big Brainz Blog.

 

Teacher and student, Imagine Learning, guest author, Ben Harrison, math fluency, math facts, math memorization, single-digit, common core, math advisory panel, Big BrainzEvery once in a while I encounter a savvy educator who is opposed to memorizing math facts–or at least he or she appears to be.

Just today I saw a fearful article that exclaimed “memorization can inhibit fluency” and “memorization . . . can be damaging.”

Of course, educators are doing a wonderful job of championing number sense, comprehension, and problem-solving, but by attacking the vital skill of automaticity, they unwittingly undermine the very processes they intend to champion.

From Where I Sit

Before I go any further, let me jump to the punchline, because I know that if you’re one of these educators, you’re already getting ready to give me your very passionate point of view.

So . . . if, as an educator, you have a negativity towards memorization, I would suggest that it’s because you haven’t seen it done well. Read more »

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5 ways to fit Common Core into your curriculum

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Adjusting your curriculum to address Common Core standards is not easy. According to a study conducted by the University of Pennsylvania, the Common Core standards are substantially different from previous state standards, not only in curriculum but in the cognitive skills they demand. Common Core focuses on higher order skills, like “understanding and analyzing written material,” rather than “memorization and performing procedures.” To help with these higher order skills, take a look at five ways Imagine Learning can bring the Common Core into your classroom curriculum.

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