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Education in the news

Imagine Learning is Acquired by Weld North

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Imagine Learning is Acquired by Weld North Provo, UT – April 07, 2014 – Imagine Learning, a Utah-based language and literacy company, announced today that it has been acquired by Weld North Holdings LLC, an investment company led by former Kaplan, Inc CEO Jonathan Grayer. The terms of the agreement were not disclosed. Weld North believes Imagine Learning is poised for substantial growth in a vibrant and growing EdTech market. “Imagine Learning’s unique game-based solution engages children, makes it fun for them to learn and supports teachers in their pursuit of teaching English language and literacy skills to their students,” said Jonathan Grayer, Chairman and CEO of Weld North. “The company’s headquarters in Provo is situated in the midst of a rapidly expanding pool of excellent talent, and it has a long runway of growth ahead. We look forward to leveraging our expertise to facilitate that growth and positively impact the way children are learning in the classroom.” Imagine Learning will remain in Provo, Utah, and there will be no immediate management changes. Over the past decade, Imagine Learning has grown from a fledgling start-up—led by founder and former CEO Susan Preator—to a flourishing multi-million dollar company, contributing to the thriving technology-friendly hub of Utah County. Imagine Learning is in the process of expanding its workforce and recently secured an additional 26,000 square feet of office space at its current location in anticipation of continued growth. Joe Swenson, Imagine Learning CEO, said the acquisition is evidence of Imagine Learning’s strong position in the digital education sector. “We want to recognize the incredible efforts of our founders, all of our coworkers, and our board members, including those from Sorenson Capital. Through their dedication and hard work over the past 10 years, Imagine Learning has become one of the most recognized digital English language and literacy programs in the country for K–6 students,” said Swenson.
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The 2012 State of the Union address

Last year we shared a Wordle based on the president's State of the Union address, and I thought it would be fun to do so again this year. Show this Wordle to your students to start a discussion about current civic issues. Based on the word cluster, what topics and issues were emphasized during the president's speech? Is his administration focusing on the right things? What do your students think? Wordle lets you create “word clouds,” or visual representations of text that give prominence to words that occur more frequently. If you don’t have an hour to spend watching the whole State of the Union address, you can get an idea of the main points pretty quickly by looking at the Wordle. Did you watch the State of the Union address? If you missed it, it's not too late-- watch the speech here:
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4 ways to involve parents and net bigger gains for your students

When it comes to boosting achievement for students of all ages, races, and socioeconomic backgrounds, the simplest answer may be the best one. New research from The Center for Public Education shows that simply getting parents involved in their child’s education can significantly impact student success. So what’s the catch?
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The lunch crunch: More students eligible for subsidized lunches

You may have heard that English learners are the fastest growing student population in America, but new reports from the Department of Agriculture show that there's another group of students that's growing at an impressive rate: kids who qualify for subsidized lunches.
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YouTube for teachers: Too little, too late?

YouTube recently announced the launch of YouTube Teachers, a portion of the website dedicated to helping teachers use videos to keep students engaged and learning. At YouTube.com/Teachers, educators can get practical tips for using videos in class, learn how to create their own YouTube channels and playlists, and even see real-life examples of teachers who are using YouTube videos to enhance student learning. The site is just the first of two YouTube initiatives designed to help educators feel more comfortable with the site. And rumor has it that YouTube will also be making a big announcement about updates that will address the concerns educators often raise about using YouTube videos at school. But will that be enough to get teachers on board? And more importantly, will it be enough to convince administrators to unblock YouTube URLs on school computers?
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