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Game-based learning

What Makes Game-Based Learning So Effective--& How Does It Work?

When we think of games, we often think of them as somewhat trivial or just for fun, but can a game-based learning environment really change the way students learn and teachers teach? Researchers agree that people learn best in a game environment, more than any other traditional form of instruction, but why? People love games. We like to have fun and we especially like to win. While it may go without saying, this tendency holds true in a learning environment as well. Winning doesn’t necessarily imply there is a loser. Some of the best game-based instructional tools provide students with a judgement-free learning environment, helping them achieve many small wins over time that lead to higher motivation and less stress. This concept also counters the pass/fail model of testing and evaluations by allowing students to focus more on learning the material and improving so that they can move on to the next level.
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Brain Science 101: What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Smarter

In a 2011 Scientific American article, behavioral therapist Andrea Kuszewski reinforced a concept that continues to gain traction today--namely, that it's possible to improve one's native intelligence. In the past, even respected scientists assumed that intelligence was purely genetic and unlikely to change over time. Nowadays, neuroscientists and cognitive therapists recognize that fluid intelligence (e.g., the capacity to learn and process new information) is the reality. More importantly, people can boost their fluid intelligence by improving their working memory. But how? Five Principles According to Kuszewski, you don't have to be a genius to improve cognition. Even those with low IQs can grow in fluid intelligence. To quote the author, "what doesn't kill you (will make) you smarter."
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Evaluating Educational Games--Just Do It

Math video game characters Do you know how most people evaluate educational games? Quite simply--they don't. For example, consider Dragon Box, an affordable, highly engaging, and extremely educational math video game on algebra. If Dragon Box were a car, it would probably be named Car of the Year. So what percentage of algebra teachers or parents do you think will be adding it to their toolbox this year? At a rough guess: probably less than one percent. ST Math, Dreambox, and Big Brainz are three other great programs that can make a significant impact on children's education. Yet how many math teachers or principals have even heard of these programs? And how many have taken steps to evaluate them to see if they're truly helpful?
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Teach Children Math the Fun Way

Mention the words "math" and "fun" in one breath and you might prompt a few raised eyebrows from those around you. But the truth remains that math actually can be fun. All the same, a negative view of math tends to prevail in America; even in the latest flurry over STEAM-based learning initiatives. For one thing, too many parents' own experiences with math were less than stellar. Similarly, teachers may feel anxious about motivating youngsters in their classrooms if they aren't already huge math fans themselves. What to do? Don't worry. Here are a few ways you can help children (and yourself) see math as a fun experience right from the start.
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The Truth About Game-Based Educational Software

Math-fact gamification Ask a typical educator about game-based learning and video games in school, and expect at least some skeptical responses. Many educators and parents worry about gaming as an educational tool. Research on the educational worth of video games has been mixed, and some educators point out the fact that most data come from short-term studies. While research on educational software is still young, increasing evidence points to positive outcomes for today’s students—despite the prevalence of headlines linking video games to bad behavior or lukewarm learning outcomes. According to James Gee, an education professor at Arizona State University, blaming all video games for poor results is like blaming all food for the existence of obese people.1
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