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language and literacy

Slowing the Summer Slide--Part I: Literacy

Summer is nearly here! While kids may be rejoicing about the prospect of a summer break, parents and educators may wonder what they can do to combat the dreaded "Summer Slide"--a time when many students lose or forget the skills they learned during the school year. As all educators know, kids who are already below grade level in their reading are especially at risk when summer break hits. Summertime and the Reading Is Easy? During the school year, struggling readers may receive more hands-on help from teachers and supplemental digital programs like Imagine Language & Literacy. But all bets are off once kids leave for the summer break. For one thing, not all parents have the luxury of being at home with kids during the summer months. What's more--daycare, summer camps, and even summer school can be expensive for a lot of families. Even parents who work may not have the means to fight the summer slide in the traditional ways. So, what's a parent to do?
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The Truth About Game-Based Educational Software

Math-fact gamification Ask a typical educator about game-based learning and video games in school, and expect at least some skeptical responses. Many educators and parents worry about gaming as an educational tool. Research on the educational worth of video games has been mixed, and some educators point out the fact that most data come from short-term studies. While research on educational software is still young, increasing evidence points to positive outcomes for today’s students—despite the prevalence of headlines linking video games to bad behavior or lukewarm learning outcomes. According to James Gee, an education professor at Arizona State University, blaming all video games for poor results is like blaming all food for the existence of obese people.1
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Introducing Imagine Museum

Student experiences don't lie: Imagine Learning is the best product on the market for providing an engaging learning experience. Awhile back we discussed the “rules of engagement” and how these rules are essential in educating students. Imagine Museum is just one of the ways Imagine Learning targets a better student experience.
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Booster's Costume Creator is Back!

As Halloween approaches, you probably ask a familiar question: What should my costume be this year? For inspiration, try Booster’s Costume Creator, back by popular demand for Halloween 2015. Go back in time as William Shakespeare, Amelia Earhart, or Albert Einstein. While you're at it, why not teach a quick history lesson in a memorable way? It's easy--just click the creator to view all your options, and then have fun learning about an important historical figure as you dress your avatar. When you settle on a combination that looks just right, pick a message and send your bewitching or dashing e-card to all your friends.   Get Started Here: Choose an avatar. Will it be Lily or Mel? You decide. Your chosen avatar will appear on the right side. Pick a background. Our background gallery lets you set the scene in a ghostly castle's hall, in an Egyptian tomb, or even in outer space. Scroll  through your options to pick a perfect background. Craft your costume. Whether you dress your character as a sinister vampire or as Cleopatra, you'll find costume pieces to match. If you like, mix things up and pair Booster's head with Count Dracula's cape or a pirate's legs. You can make your costume as tame or as wild as you like! Send to friends. Make someone's day with a little spooky fun. Print and deliver your Halloween greeting in person, or simply send an e-card version to anyone you choose.
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Brand new activities target core skills

The latest 14.3 release is jam-packed with powerful new content in three activity suites. The new activities teach core concepts about syllables and contractions, increase depth of knowledge, and develop critical reasoning skills. The Points and Reasons Suite helps students develop critical reasoning skills and prepare for testing. Points and Reasons uses peer modeling in a real-world situation to teach students how to identify, create, and support a claim. Light it Up allows students to practice reasoning skills as they select the best point to support a claim. Prove the Point asks students to read a passage, identify the main point, and think about the quality of suggested reasons to select the best point to support the claim.
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