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Common Core and Multiplication Tables

Much has been said and written about the use of Common Core standards in today's classrooms, particularly when it comes to CCSS math standards. Case in point: some educators claim that mastering multiplication tables is less important in the Common Core. But is this claim really true? Let's take a deeper look. Multiplication and the Common Core When it comes to multiplication standards, here's what Common Core has to say: CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.C.7 Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers. In a nutshell, the more you care about developing higher-order mathematics, the more important fluency becomes. Now, let's deconstruct a few Common Core assumptions as they relate to math.
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How to Choose a Fun and Effective Math Video Game

Let’s face it—not many kids are interested in reciting their multiplication tables or practicing addition when they’ve got video games to play, TV to watch, and technology to explore. Unfortunately, too many parents and educators automatically assume that video games are mere time wasters, as mentioned in our earlier discussion about game-based learning. Of course, sorting out the effective math games from the mediocre ones can be a challenge. Not every game is equal when it comes to producing lasting learning. So, what to do?
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Math Fluency Can Save Your Marriage

Yes, this is a tongue-in-cheek post, but considering how our Big Brainz team members spend their lives trying to help folks master their core math facts, we thought this would be a wonderful story to share about how math fluency just might save your relationship. James Clerk Maxwell and his wife Katherine--together, a math-fluent pair!   Read the article here: Math Fluency Can Save Your Marriage Enjoy!
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Language Acquisition and the Mathematics Classroom

A guest post by Linda Hardman President of Linda A. Hardman Consulting, Inc., teacher, and developer of multiple award-winning K12 math products Imagine Learning now publishes monthly guest posts in order to stimulate conversations about K12 education across the country. Opinions expressed herein are those of the individual author and may not necessarily reflect the official opinion of Imagine Learning.   According to the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), the percentage of English language learners (ELL) in US public schools grew in the 2012–2013 school year by 9.2 percent (i.e., 4.4 million students) compared to the prior school year. Additionally, a new Pew Research Center study reported that a near-record 13.9 percent of the US population today is foreign born, with 45 million immigrants residing here. A diverse group of young students Because of these trends, students are significantly challenged to master academic language across the US. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for mathematics are also placing high demands in mathematics regarding abstract and quantitative reasoning, constructing viable arguments and critiquing the reasoning of others, and looking for/expressing regularity in repeated reasoning. Students and educators are even more challenged with the acquisition of academic language as a tool for mastering conceptual and procedural understanding of mathematical standards and practices. As a result of the increasing amount of ELL students and the challenges presented by the CCSS for mathematics, it is important for students to acquire both academic language skills and mathematical fluency. Moreover, the same essential reading components and first-language supports provided in reading classes also belong in the mathematics classroom.
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Imagine Math Facts Games: The Easy Way to Automaticity

    If you're a teacher, you may notice that some students who struggle with reading also struggle with math automaticity. Can such students recall math facts when they move on to more challenging math tasks? And how do you know that your students are completely fluent? In January 2016, Imagine Learning acquired Big Brainz, a Utah-based company known for its effective math-fact fluency software. Since then, Big Brainz was re-named Imagine Math Facts. This blog post will describe what the software is and how it helps students become fluent in math facts.
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