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3 ways to motivate students

Do your students suffer from a lack of motivation? In the midst of spring break and standardized testing, students may find it difficult to focus on their schoolwork. One of the best ways to motivate students is to get them invested in their own learning. Because once students can see their progress, they are more likely to want to progress. Take a look at these tried-and-true ideas teachers across the country are using to motivate their students.
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New ways to keep your English learners motivated

Cutting-edge research on game-based learning may hold the secret to keeping your English learners motivated, even in the face of failure. And for students trying to master a second language, learning how to overcome failure can boost in-class achievement and long-term success. Here’s how you can put this simple strategy to work for your students:
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Summer reading for teachers: 25 books for your reading list

There’s no doubt that summer reading is good for students—there’s evidence of the importance of summer reading everywhere, including some recent findings from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. But picking up a good book isn’t only for kids. Stop your own summer slide by checking out this summer reading list made especially for teachers (and other grown-ups too).
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Tips for making the most of the end of the year

It's that time again: the weather is getting warmer, the days are getting longer, and students and teachers alike are looking forward to summer vacation. Such an atmosphere might make it difficult to stay motivated, but there's no reason to coast until the end of the year. In a child's education, every week counts. So how can you make sure that these last few weeks count for your students? Read on for some tips for helping both teachers and students stay motivated through the end of the school year.
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New proof supporting summer reading programs

My dad looked like the proudest grandpa in the world as he told my mom and me about spending the afternoon with my seven-year-old niece. He told us about how she had completely wowed him by teaching him something new about orca whales— specifically, the methods they use to hunt. “I just don’t know how she knew all of that,” my dad said. And then my mom revealed the secret to my niece’s whale knowledge: my sister had assigned her children book reports over the summer to keep them school-ready for the coming year. As a seven-year-old, I probably would have considered this idea cruel and unusual punishment. As an adult and education advocate, all I could think was, “My sister is a genius!” And my niece isn’t the only proof that summer reading programs are working. School Library Journal recently released some interesting results about the proven effects of summer reading.
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