Skip to main content
Blog > multiplication

multiplication

How to Use Multiplication Worksheets to Assess Fluency

Multiplication worksheets. Schools commonly use these to measure math fact fluency, yet aggregating response times is tricky, especially given the typical number of math facts measured. What's more, the resulting data rarely tells you which math facts a student knows fluently compared with facts they are still calculating. How to Maximize Effectiveness When it comes to multiplication worksheets, use these tips to maximize your effectiveness in the classroom: 1. Assess each individual fact. You can use a stopwatch or let a program like Timez Attack do the job for you automatically; but at some point, it's critical to measure which facts students can recall automatically and which ones they have to stop and calculate. If you don't measure each fact accurately, you won't fix it.
Read More

Share

Common Core and Multiplication Tables

Much has been said and written about the use of Common Core standards in today's classrooms, particularly when it comes to CCSS math standards. Case in point: some educators claim that mastering multiplication tables is less important in the Common Core. But is this claim really true? Let's take a deeper look. Multiplication and the Common Core When it comes to multiplication standards, here's what Common Core has to say: CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.C.7 Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers. In a nutshell, the more you care about developing higher-order mathematics, the more important fluency becomes. Now, let's deconstruct a few Common Core assumptions as they relate to math.
Read More

Share

A Guide to Math Picture Books in the Classroom

If you're an elementary teacher, you've probably seen these two kinds of students in your classroom: Students who understand and enjoy math. Students who are frustrated by math because they don't understand it. It's your job to help those in the second group find their way into the first group. Luckily, picture books about math can really help. The 'Why' of Math Picture Books It's human nature to enjoy stories. By relating to a character who feels the way they do, students can gain the confidence to move through their own challenges--both in and outside the classroom. Even more importantly, there's a tangible link between reading and math. It stands to reason that doing one can help the other. When teachers use picture books containing math themes (either implicit or explicit), they offer students a contextualized experience with mathematics generally. Plus, a good story can comfort the heart of any student who's afraid of math.
Read More

Share

Memorize Your Times Tables, Dear

Six in every ten Americans report having difficulty solving some type of math, and 30 percent of Americans say they would rather clean the bathroom than solve a math problem. Yet 93 percent of Americans say that developing good math skills is crucial to having a successful life. So why would anyone dislike something that brings success? Most Americans develop their attitudes about math from others. For example, if parents don't enjoy math, they may pass that attitude forward to children. Perhaps parents or teachers nag too much. "Memorize your times tables!" they might say, "Work harder!" Or, perhaps nagging isn't to blame. Maybe students feel inadequate during math class because they're just missing out on some key fundamentals. Whatever the reasons, no one can really deny the importance of mathematics. Math is important in everyday life!
Read More

Share

Fun Math Games For Kids This Summer

At Imagine Learning, we know that “fun” and “math” don’t necessarily go hand-in-hand. This challenge makes learning basic math concepts a little difficult sometimes. However, we also know how important these basic math skills are––so we created a list of super fun math games to help your kids learn subtraction, addition, division, and multiplication this summer. Or anytime! Beach Ball Addition Supplies needed: Beach ball Permanent marker Instructions: Label a beach ball with numbers 1-12 (make sure to repeat numbers for practice adding doubles). Have your children toss the ball to each other. Before they can pass it on to the next person, they simply add whatever numbers are under their hands after they catch it.
Read More

Share