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reading comprehension

Learning Out Loud: Readers Theater for Struggling Readers

  If you have a struggling reader in your classroom, you already know how that student feels about reading anything out loud. And yet, reading out loud is one of the best ways to improve students' oral fluency. For instance, within Imagine Language & Literacy, struggling readers gain confidence as they read and repeat text from leveled books and regularly participate in activities like Fluent Reader. What's more, when teachers listen back to the recordings, they can easily track student progress toward oral fluency. But Readers Theater can be another way to engage struggling readers and help them read aloud--with expression. Why a Readers Theater? If all the world's a stage, then every classroom can be transformed into a theater--in this case, a Readers Theater, which:
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Use Story Maps for Better Reading Comprehension

Today, anyone who wants to read an article or a book can do so quickly. Most can search for reading materials at the click of a mouse or on library/classroom shelves. But even engaged readers sometimes face information overload. For example, young or beginning readers may have trouble remembering the important elements of a story. If you're a teacher, you understand this dilemma and likely use multiple resources to help your students understand what they read. A story map is just one resource that helps young learners with reading comprehension.
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Imagine Museum is waiting for you!

Have you met all of the characters from Imagine Learning English? Many of you may be familiar with Pete, Amanda, Chloe, and Mic --the characters who live on Imagine Island and help your students learn the basics of literacy. However, as students master those skills and move on to more advanced instruction, they are introduced to Alex, Nick, Lily and Mel -- characters who help students learn more academic vocabulary and master important reading comprehension strategies like answering main idea and inferential questions. These cool kids hang out at the Imagine Museum, just a stone's throw from the coast of Imagine Island, and they are joined by Booster, a flying robot who gives students feedback when they need a little extra help. Each character has a specialty. For example, Alex focuses on reading and comprehension; Mel helps with vocabulary. Check out the video below to see the kids (and robot!) who are helping your students master language and literacy:
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