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Universal Design for individualized learning

Peeked inside a typical classroom lately? If so, you're likely to see one teacher surrounded by an increasingly diverse group of students--each with unique learning needs. What's more, that 'typical' classroom is filled with students who are anything but typical. For one thing, there's really no such thing as an average student. Each class might contain students who struggle with reading or math, students who don't yet speak English, and students with disabilities. On the other end of the spectrum are the gifted students who may need more challenges to stay engaged. How on earth can one teacher meet the needs of all these diverse learners?
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Success stories: Alexis's story

As part of our One Year Later series, we’re sharing the stories of four students who have made remarkable progress with Imagine Learning English in just one year. This is the first of four posts in the series. If you’re like me, you’re wondering where 2010 has gone. The new year always seems to sneak up on me, and I’ll probably be dating my checks wrong well into February. At the same time that I wonder where the year has gone, I also like to take a moment to reflect on what a difference one year makes. One year ago no one knew what Wikileaks was. One year ago LeBron James was beloved in Cleveland. And one year ago no one knew that something called an iPad would become the best-selling electronic device in history. One year later One year can also make a big difference in the life of a student. Recently, Imagine Learning had the chance to catch up with four students we had first visited in November 2009, when the students were just beginning to use Imagine Learning English. In November of 2010, the video team returned to see the progress these students had made in just one year with Imagine Learning English.
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Engaging students with classic educational videos

If you were a typical kid in the seventies, you watched a lot of Sesame Street and The Electric Company. These two children’s programs taught us how to spell and read using humorous sketches, cartoons, fuzzy puppets, and catchy songs. I spent many afterschool hours in front of the TV watching Big Bird, Grover, Cookie Monster, and Bert & Ernie on Sesame Street. After that, The Electric Company’s stars, Bill Cosby, Morgan Freeman, and Rita Moreno, taught me about reading while making me laugh. These many years later, I still remember (and sometimes can sing along to) my favorite clips. Whether you work with English learners, students with disabilities, or early childhood education students, these clips are still a great resource for introducing new literacy, spelling, and punctuation concepts in a fun way. Here’s a list of five of my favorites:
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