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Tolerance

How Do You Say Your Name? Thoughts on Student Identity

A new boy shows up at school. As he walks through the classroom door, the teacher welcomes him by saying, "Tell us your name." The boy, who has just moved to America from the Philippines, announces his name as Banoy Pamatmat. Whereupon the teacher asks, "Could you repeat that?" Welcome to an increasingly common scenario in today's schools. As more immigrants relocate to America, educators encounter a wider array of new names and faces. And many of those names are challenging to pronounce.
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The Importance of Multicultural Equity in Education

A guest post by Colleen Chung Teaching Coordinator for ELL,Title 1, & 21st Century Grant - Alvah Scott Elementary School (Aiea, HI) Imagine Learning now publishes monthly guest posts in order to stimulate conversations about K12 education across the country. Opinions expressed herein are those of the individual author and may not necessarily reflect the official opinion of Imagine Learning. Designed by Freepik   My husband is Hawaiian, Chinese, Japanese, and Portuguese, while I am third-generation Irish. As a diverse couple, we decided that when we had children, we would raise them here in Hawaii, the state of Aloha. Interestingly, our family's multicultural trends don't stop there. My daughter just married a man from Norway and we expect their children to speak both Norwegian and English. Their wedding represented families from four continents. Diversity is the American way! It not only helps us learn from each other, but it also inspires greatness, as you will see from the following example.
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