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Charles A. Dana Center to Advise Imagine Learning on Mathematics Instruction

Utah-based Imagine Learning announces a new advisory relationship with the internationally recognized Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE PROVO, UT and AUSTIN, TX - September 12, 2017 - Imagine Learning, award-winning developer of supplemental digital curricula for K–12 students, recently signed an agreement with The Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin, a widely respected content, research, policy, and advocacy institute for math and science education. The Charles A. Dana Center focuses on K–16 mathematics and science education with an emphasis on strategies for improving student engagement, motivation, persistence, and achievement, particularly for traditionally underrepresented students.
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Our Summer Math Splash Winners!

When school begins each Fall, it's anyone's guess as to how well students will remember what they learned the previous year. Research shows that students can lose an average of 2.6 months of math skills during the summer. What's more, the average teacher can spend four to six weeks just re-teaching material that students learned previously. Fortunately, those skills don't have to slide. By dedicating just a little time and mental muscle each day, students can strengthen key skills--including those critical math skills--for greater success once school begins again. Enter the Summer Math Splash Challenge
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How to Reduce Math Anxiety

The alarm sounds, telling you it's time to get up and greet the day, but as you slowly wake from your slumber and wipe the sleep from your eyes, a familiar feeling of dread rushes through you in an overwhelming wave. It's test day--and even though you've studied for hours and scored fairly well on practice exams and homework assignments, doubts assail you and make you question whether or not you're really ready for algebra. Math Anxiety is defined as “the panic, helplessness, paralysis, and mental disorganization that arises among some people when they are required to solve a mathematical problem." A common phenomenon that affects many, math anxiety is related to performance anxiety and is likely to extend far outside of the classroom if not recognized and proactively managed.
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Imagine Blue Backpacks for Utah Foster Kids

Every year across the nation, close to half a million foster children go back to school. Unfortunately, too many of these children have just entered the foster care system with nothing but a few articles of clothing and personal items stuffed into a garbage bag. And school supplies aren't likely to be among those belongings. Imagine Learning Steps Up
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Mistakes Are Okay! 10 Inspirational Quotes on Mistakes

You may have heard the term "growth mindset" quite a bit lately. The true power of establishing a growth mindset revolves around the idea that an individual's abilities and intelligence can be developed through hard work, dedication, and the right kind of mentoring. This idea contrasts the traditional "fixed mindset" approach to learning, which says intelligence is static and we are pretty much born with what we have, for better or worse. A fixed mindset can be toxic in the classroom, especially in a subject like mathematics. Students can quickly become frustrated or discouraged if they make mistakes, which can lead to a loss of confidence and motivation. Teachers who embrace a growth mindset will often find students coming out of their comfort zones and achieving more than they ever thought possible.
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A Back-to-School Mindset: 4 Easy Tips for Educators

Photo source: Pixabay   It's hard to believe, but the end of summer break approaches. The question is--do you view the prospect with delight or dread? If you're like most educators, the answer probably lies somewhere in between both extremes. But even the best back-to-school plan can use a few practical tips. So, to help you get back in the game, here are 4 ways to boost your back-to-school mindset and keep your head in the game before the new school year even begins.
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6 Summer Math Activities for Kids of Any Age

Summer is upon us and students across the country are getting a well-deserved break from the rigors of academia. The pleasant weather and time off make summer a favorite season for children and adults alike, but learning doesn’t have to stop just because school is on summer break. The dreaded “summer slide” in learning impacts all students, with low-income students feeling the biggest hit – losing 2.5 to 3 months of grade level equivalency over the summer months. The impact of summer learning decay is felt largely in mathematics, setting some students up for failure once they go back to school in September. But all hope is not lost. Aside from alternatives to traditional summer learning programs (i.e., online math programs), students can continue to think mathematically over summer break by turning everyday activities into math-learning opportunities.
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What Makes Game-Based Learning So Effective--& How Does It Work?

When we think of games, we often think of them as somewhat trivial or just for fun, but can a game-based learning environment really change the way students learn and teachers teach? Researchers agree that people learn best in a game environment, more than any other traditional form of instruction, but why? People love games. We like to have fun and we especially like to win. While it may go without saying, this tendency holds true in a learning environment as well. Winning doesn’t necessarily imply there is a loser. Some of the best game-based instructional tools provide students with a judgement-free learning environment, helping them achieve many small wins over time that lead to higher motivation and less stress. This concept also counters the pass/fail model of testing and evaluations by allowing students to focus more on learning the material and improving so that they can move on to the next level.
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Fun Summer Learning Activity: DIY Sundial

Today is the first day of summer--also known by astronomers, scientists, and mathematicians as the Summer Solstice. The June Solstice takes place each year between June 20th and June 22nd and means that the Earth is farthest from the Sun on that day. This also makes students on summer vacation happy as there are more hours of sunlight to enjoy!
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Slowing the Summer Slide--Part II: Math

As we discussed in a previous post, the typical American student enjoys a three-month break from school for summer vacation, providing well-deserved rest from the rigors of academia. But studies suggest the summer fun may also come at a price. According to a 2011 study by researchers at the RAND Corporation called “Making Summer Count: How Summer Programs Can Boost Children’s Learning,” summer break – albeit necessary and beneficial in many aspects – could potentially set some students back two to three full months of grade-level equivalency if not supplemented with additional summer learning support. The RAND study also indicates that the summer slide is more pronounced in mathematics, a subject in which learning decay occurs more rapidly over summer vacation simply because of math inactivity. Students may read over summer vacation, but few practice their math skills.
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