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3 ways to build a community for struggling readers

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Sometimes all a struggling reader needs is a support group. But with all your students out of school, where can they get the support they need to keep reading? It's time to build a community.

Sometimes all a struggling reader needs is a support group. But with all your students out of school, where can they get the support they need to keep reading?

It's time to build a community.

Creating a community for readers is motivating, encouraging, and, simply put, fun! Kids get excited to share what they've read, to get ideas on what to read next, and to hear about all the other stories their friends are reading. Joining a reading community is a quick way to make friends and find other kids with similar interests. Here are a few ways your students can get connected.

1. Join Goodreads.

Goodreads is an online community of book lovers. You can post what you're reading and write reviews of books you've already crossed off your list. There are entire groups on Goodreads.com that are by kids, for kids. No adults allowed. Create a Goodreads group for your class and let the kids share reviews all summer.

2. Start a book club.

They're not just for adults now. Kids across the country are joining up with others locally or online to read and discuss books. Parents can get involved by recommending books or thinking up fun activities to do as a group that relate to the book of the month. For example, read Number the Stars and then visit a World War II museum exhibit.

3. Announce story time at the local library.

Let kids (and parents) know about library-sponsored events like story time. They'll meet other kids and start a community there. Libraries sponsor many events over the summer and usually have their own reading-incentives while school is out.

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